General running information and thoughts from a guy who has gone around the track too many times.

Tag Archives: doughnuts

I ran 331 miles in 12 days.

Not all at one time.

In May I ran 167 miles in 7 days from Vernal, Utah to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. In August I ran 164 miles in 6 days from Mahoney City, Pennsylvania to New York City, New York. All for MS Run the US Relay.

I learned a lot about myself and about running.

Want to learn what I learned?

Keep reading.

  1. Getting started. Sometimes when you first wake-up and realize you need to run long, the mind starts telling you all the reasons why you can’t. Leave it to the mind and you’ll stay in bed. I found that getting my feet moving was the key to waking the mind up to what my body could actually do. When the brain gets on board anything can happen.
  2. Real Food is good. That just seems silly to say, but it’s totally true. I have tired most name brand sports drink, gels and the what-have-yous. Running magazines are full of ads that tells us what products works best. My truth is that sports-aid-items do not work for me. I have found that real food in the form of fruits, oatmeal, raisins, nuts, whole grains, and potato chips (I realize that potato chips might not be considered a real food, but it doesn’t come out of a tube) really works for me. I also like water over sport drinks. And Coke. Nothing like a cold satisfying Coke at 10 miles. Just the right amount of sugar, caffeine and pleasure; which can keep me going for another 10 miles. Add some potato chips and I will run 30 miles. Don’t even get me started on doughnuts.
  3. After 28.5 miles. Nothing tastes better.Beer – it’s an acceptable post-run beverage. I am a man of rewards and beer is one of those rewards that can keep me moving forward. Knowing that a cold frosty bottle of brew; which has my name on it, makes those last few miles bearable. Oh, there are some nutritional benefits, but who cares. Right?
  4. Shirtless running. When the sun is out, the temperature warm and the humidity is high I prefer running without a shirt. Please do not give me all that crap about sunburn, sunscreen and skin cancer. We were born to run and we were born to be out in the sun. Period. Give it a try, you’ll find it refreshing. Anton knows. (Disclaimer – local decently laws may apply.)
  5. Wear the right shoes. The right shoes for you, that is. A good running store, like West Seattle Runner, will have you try various models to help you decide what feels good. Pick the shoes that are going to support you on your adventure. I would have been nuts to pick a lightweight, minimal shoe to run 30 miles on pavement. With broken glass and dead snakes.
  6. Brooks GlycerinHigh tech material can make you day. These new tech shirts and shorts will wick (a word a runner never said in 70’s and 80’s) moisture away from your skin. This allows you to stay cool and dry. Easy to pack, carry and dries quickly. Make sure they fit and will not rub you in all the wrong places. If they do rub, get some Body Glide.
  7. Have a great support person or team to help you. These will be people who care about you and will have your food and gear ready for when you’ll need it. They can also do your thinking for you when you aren’t thinking right. Just remember to be nice to them, especially when your Demon Side appears.
  8. Know your equipment. The morning of your adventure is not the time to try to figure out your new GPS watch. Or even a headlamp. You need to know how everything works before you even put them in your pack. Read the manual and experiment.
  9. Know where you are going. External input is nice, but comes with a percentage of error. GPS watches can be off. A nice person may not know what they hell they are talking about. Memory fails. It is your responsibility to know where you are going. Know your route and make notes if needed.
  10. Have Fun! This adventure is yours. You trained and dreamed to do this. Now, go out and have some fun. And be safe.

 

 

Shirtless Running


This week we are going to look at jogging; what it is and what it is not. The story goes that famed running coach from New Zealand, Arthur Lydiard, made popular the term “jogging”. What Lydiard was doing was promoting a slower than normal running pace that also allowed for socializing. Instead of running mile repeats or intervals, Lydiard encouraged runners to head out onto the roads and run slower. Take it easy. Enjoy the sights. Discuss things. Solve the world problems or debate why liquid soap was invented. Jogging provided these types of experiences; cause discussing the latest Bruce Willis movie during mile repeats is not going to happen.Trust me on that.

US running coach Bill Bowerman brought Lydiard’s thinking to the US in 1966 by publishing the book “Jogging”. I own a copy of said book.

I hate to say it but some faster runners didn’t like the hordes of new and slower runners who were coming on the scene back in the 1970′s. Jamming up the lanes on the track forcing faster runners to the outside. Getting attention cause how they looked, which was more relaxed with nice hairdos. These slower newbies were calling themselves “runners”. Many faster runners, when running slower, were talking smack about all the new joggers on the scene. Newbies were more interested in weight loss/control and health benefits that running can produce than how fast they ran that last mile in. They couldn’t really care less if they were on the path for Olympic gold or not. They met as groups and ran around parks, neighborhoods and city streets. They began to popularize running as a social outlet. Joggers also showed that running could be really fun. Oh my.

Unfortunately the “running” group look down at the “jogging” group as a lesser group. Some runners would cringe if they were ever called a jogger and would quickly correct the term. I have had people introduce themselves to me and then say something like “I’m just a jogger. Not a runner like you.” As though their activity needed validation.

Does it really matter if a person is a runner or a jogger? Do we really need to have a “better than thou” stand for an act that comes to us from our genetic code? I don’t think so.I think we are all runners and joggers. They are one in the same.


Today is February 17, 2013. It’s a Sunday. The sky is partly cloudy. No rain. Yeah for that.

Yesterday I posted my intent on running a relay segment for MS Run the US, a fundraiser for multiple sclerosis research and eduction. I am very excited to participate in this relay. Honored too. Some people have passed comments along to me that tell me I am insane. Such comments remind me that I am on target. This is how I want to live me life, by doing insane things.

I have Three Stages of training to get me to Vernal, Utah, where my segment starts and finishes in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, some 164 miles away. I will have seven days to complete this journey. If I don’t, the support staff will shoot me. Well, I might beg them to shoot me, but they probably won’t.

Since the first of the year I have been building my running base. This was Stage One of my strategy. Spending as much time running in the rain to prepare me for running in a very arid part of the country. I know. That doesn’t make sense. We get what we get. During the winter months here in the San Juan Islands, we get rain. Or we got rain. Stage One was designed to get me use to spending more time out running. Rain or no rain. Stage Two, which started the first of February increases my mileage or time I spend running. This Stage two has me running twice a day and running long runs during weekends. I have run one 20 mile run already in February. Good for me.

As of today I have 95 days until I leave Vernal for Steamboat. I think people in Colorado refer to Steamboat Springs by just Steamboat. I will too.

Anyway. I have 95 days. My goal is to run 1,000 miles from today until May 23 (which is also my little sister’s birthday). This plan averages 10.5 miles per day for the next 95 days. That’s doable. I will be running many days where my mileage will be over 20 miles. I will need to get use to that much distance as my relay segment is about 24 miles per day. I have trained like this before when I ran my first 50 miler. It worked then. I am hoping it will work for me again.

If I count all the mileage I have all ready ran this year (240) and add it to the 1,000 goal miles, I will have 1240 miles by the time I start for Steamboat. On paper this all looks good. The challenge comes down to GMBOTD (getting my butt out the door). I except that challenge. I do find that the dark and wet days of our winters to be a challenge for me. Most of the routes I run don’t have street lamps. Just darkness. I have a headlamp for this darkness. I also have a nice Brooks Running rain jacket that is reflective. Reflective material is good for our dark mornings and nights.

I know I will have my challenges. Mostly mental challenges that will keep me indoors. Physically I was born to run. I also run so slow that I couldn’t possibly hurt myself. My challenges are mostly comfort related. Soft, comfy chair and a good book will result in no running. (Must remember not to go to the library).

I can, as they say in Wyoming to “pull up your cowboy boots and get it done.” Actually, I don’t wear cowboy boots. That saying still works for me. I am from Wyoming, you know. Giddyup is another Wyoming term, but it doesn’t apply here. Yippee ki yah has already been taken. Hopefully when I reach Steamboat someone will shout that most famous of all cowboy sayings “Whooooa”. Which means to stop.

I do need your help by donating to the cause. You can do that by clicking I Would Like to Donate. Any amount is appreciated.

Stage Three hasn’t been developed as of yet. Stay tuned, this journey is going to be wild.

Clark


In a few days we will be celebrating the birth of another year.  Oh Joy!  I like New Years, I really do.  I set all these cool goals and aspirations that I want to focus on and then, after a few weeks, give up on them.  I return to my normal way of life.  For example one goal has been to get up at 5:00 am every morning and running for two hours.  Sounds good to me, until 5:00 am and then nothing sounds good except staying in bed.  Normal people do that; stay in bed that is.

I always start the year with goals of races/events I want to participate in.  How many pounds I want to lose (same pounds each and every year).  I write down how I want to be a better person by not walking slowly across the street when I know a car and driver are in a hurry.  I vow not to place any regular apples in the Organic produce section.  Oh yeah.  I can be evil.

Just last week I was in West Seattle to spend an early Christmas weekend with my son and his family.  I was about to share some great thought of mine, when I received that “don’t say it” look from my daughter-in-law.  The mother of my three grandchildren.   Apparently, last summer, I told my 4 year old grandson a story about how I was trapped in an elevator.  (I thought the story very funny).  Apparently he, until last Sunday, wouldn’t step foot in any elevator, even if his most wonderful mother was trying to handle three kids and numerous sacks of groceries.  Last Sunday we took him with us up and down an elevator to ease his mind.  Thank God we didn’t get stuck.  That would have been bad.  Really bad.

I promise to watch what I say around my grandchildren.  Like that is going to happen.

Back to the New Year.

I have some things that are on my list, like running some type of adventure event once a month.  Yes, getting up at 5:00 am to run does count.  I want to run Nookachamps in January, Orcas Island 25K in February.  March is up in the air.  April will be the Yakima River Skyline 50K – like last year’s spanking wasn’t enough.  May will be the Sun Mountain 50 miler -my goal is to finish in daylight.  Also in May I will be participating in the MS Run Across the US – more on that later.  I also want to run around Mt. St. Helen and Mt. Rainer.  Of course, there will be many Doughnut Runs.

What are you planning on running?

Whatever you do, have fun and be safe.

Have a great New Year!

Clark

ps – meet at 11:30 on New Years Eve at San Juan Fitness for a Run In The New Year Fun.  No fee.


If you know me, you would know that I have been a Doughnut Runner for some time.  Running for doughnuts all started as a reward for getting our weekend runs in.  From Friday Harbor the distance to Roche Harbor, where our doughnuts are baked fresh, is a tad over 11 miles.  Bingo, made a good mid-distance run motivation.  Over the years we have added miles, encouraged people to come run with us and have run for doughnuts in rain, sunshine and snow fall.

For the next few months, Paul Hopkins and myself, will be hosting a Sunday morning Doughnut Run, from San Juan Fitness to Roche Harbor.  See the details below and schedule some time for a run.

Clark

Doughnut Run Details

What: 11.2 mile run from San Juan Island Fitness to Roche Harbor Resort.  Open to all levels of runners.

When: Every Sunday morning, starting August 5 at 8:00 a.m. from San Juan Island Fitness

Why: For the love of donuts. And these aren’t just any donuts, these are Roche Harbor doughnuts!

Bring: Water/electrolyes. Some cash for dooughnuts and coffee.Ride back: There are no formal rides back to town.

Entry fee: Free.


The last couple of weekends runners I know have participated in some pretty hard and challenging events.  Here is a recap.

James Varner.  I have been watching James training all year long and was impressed with what he was doing.  He is one of my heros.  On Friday, July 13, James toed the starting line of the Hardrock 100.  Unfortunately, James pulled out of the event at 60 miles.  He’ll be back!

Hal Koerner.  Hal also toed the line at Hardrock and pulled out a great victory – setting a course record at 24:50.

Candice Burt.  Candice is an item with James Varner and was with him at Hardrock.  Saturday, July 21, Candice toed the starting line at the Tahoe Rim Trail 100 Miler.  Having James to crew and pace her helped Candice finishing in 22:50.  Good enough for 2nd Woman and 7th over all.

Terry Sentinella.  Terry’s from Anacortes.  Not only does he run ultras.  He is also the Race Director of the Skagit Flats Marathon and Half Marathon.  Last week Terry ran the Badwater 135 Ultramarathon, where he started at Death Valley and finished on Mt. Whitney.  Last year Terry finished in 32:10, good for 15th place.  This year, Terry finished in 29:40 and 10th place.  Next year, I am guess he’ll be running under 24 hours.

Carla MacDiarmid and Daniel Seaton.  They both lived on San Juan Island, but moved to Anacortes.  They don’t train with Terry but live in his neighborhood.  This past weekend, the two of them were team members running various sections in the Ragnar Northwest Passage, 200 miles relay and lived in a van for 24 hours.  Welcome to the world of bizarre running.

Rob Bondurant.  From the Port Townsend area.  Rob is participating in the Tahoe Rim Trail 100 Miler this weekend, finishing in 29:16.  He was in Death Valley, last week, crewing for Terry.

Paul Hopkins.  It’s been awhile since Paul climbed into a wet suit for a IronMan.  On Sunday, July 15, Paul participated in the Lake Stevens 70.3 IronMan, finishing in 5:56.  Welcome back, Paul.

Scott Jurek.  10 Questions for Scott in this issue of Time.

Me?  I ran for doughnuts!

Congrats to all those who have participated in these and other running events.  Hope you had fun!

Clark

www.runhappyrunhard.com


I have been thinking about this race idea.  Maybe not a race, but a running event that has running for doughnuts at it’s heart.  Have your attention?

Basically the course would be to run from Friday Harbor down to, on roads, the American Camp area, turn around, run back to town then out to Roche Harbor Resort for, you guessed it, doughnuts.  Although, I don’t have the entire course laid out, I do have some ideas.  I will post the final course on this site.  On thing for sure, we will run from bottom to top of the island.  Pretty cool, huh?

Here are the particulars, that may or could and will probably change.

Date:  September 16, 2012, Sunday

Start Time:  7:00 am.  (I know it’s early but we want to get off the roads before the nice people head to church).

Entry Fee:  Zero.  Nothing.  (Donations would be accepted along with a big hug).

Support.  No aid stations (well maybe one).  Runners must carry own water, food, etc..  We will have coolers out and about, but will not be supplying cups.  Bring you own.  We will have a party zone at Roche Harbor with, you guessed it, Doughnuts!

Course:  Final course will be posted on this web site.

Entrants will be limited to 20 runners and must be approved by the selection committee.  Oh yeah, this is going to be one small marathon, but with love, it will grow.

Transportation back to town will be provided, not sure how as of yet.

How to Register?  Contact Clark by following this Link.

Coming from Off-Island?  Camping maybe available.  Contact me for more information.

Roche Harbor Doughnuts



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