General running information and thoughts from a guy who has gone around the track too many times.

Author Archives: Clark Gilbert

Lydiard Levels I & II Coaches Certification

May 9 - 11

LYDIARD TRAINING is the most sophisticated coaching method ever developed and the most widely used system worldwide by both recreational and professional endurance athletes.

This course gives detailed Theory and Application of Lydiard training, including

* The Five Energy Developmental Phases,

* The Lydiard Principles

* The Essential Timing Considerations that prepare the runner for peak performances when it counts, year after year.

Participants learn not only the what, how and why of each training session but the Secret of Correct Sequencing that greatly amplifies the Training Effect. Coaches and their athletes will have the means to reset their sights to season after season of stellar performances. Attendees are invited to participate in demo sessions of specialty workouts.

COURSE HOURS

  * Friday May 9th:  6:30 – 8:30 pm

  * Saturday May 10th:  9 am – 5 pm

  * Sunday May 11th:  9 am – 3 pm

COURSE CONTENT

Evening Session6.30pm – 8:30 pm

  * Introductions

  * The Lydiard Lineage: A history of Arthur Lydiard and the influence of his training methods worldwide

  * Debunking Myths and Misconceptions

  * Video

Day Two: 9am – 5pm

  * The Five Essential Lydiard Principles

  * Energy Pathways: ATP, Mitochondria and Energy Production for Endurance Sports

  * Overview of the Training Pyramid

  * The Adaptation Curve

  * Starting off on the Right Foot: Pre‐training phases, Health Considerations, Leg‐Building

  * VO2 Max: Estimator and other measurements, VDOT scale and Race Prediction, The VO2 Max Interview

  * Aerobic Conditioning: How to Build a Base, the Physiology of the Long Run

  * Muscle Fiber Recruitment

  * Nuts and Bolts: Strides, Fartlek, The Out and Back Run, Progress Calibration Run

  * Hill Training: Application, the Foot Spring, Workout Variations and demo

  * Q & A and Discussion

Day Three: 9am  – 3pm

  * Essential Recovery Indicators

  * Overcoming Over-training: Signs and Remedies: Diet, Acid/alkaline balance, hormones, Illness, weight, sleep, adrenal function

  * Interval Training

  * Coordination Phase: Balancing aerobic & anaerobic

  * Speedwork and Sharpening

  * TaperTweaking and Peaking: Race Week/Non Race‐week plan

  * Racing and Pacing Considerations

  * Race Recovery Factors

  * Macro-cycles: Planning considerations. Training Modulation. Designing long‐term plans.

  * Designing a Daily Training Plan

  * The Art of Adapting Lydiard Training to the individual

  * Q & A and Discussion

 

Details

Start: May 9, 2014
End: May 11, 2014

Organizer: Lori McConnell with West Seattle Runner

Phone: (206) 938-0545
Email: lorimcconnell@hotmail.com
Website: http://www.westseattlerunner.com

WSRunner

Venue:  Camp Long, West Seattle, Washington

Phone:
(206) 684-7434
5200 35th Ave SW Seattle, WA 98126 United States

+ Google Map

Website:  http://www.seattle.gov/parks/environment/camplong.htm

Tickets

Early Bird Special $315 This is the discounted price if registered before 4/9/2014.
Lydiard Certificate I&II for RRCA coaches $300 RRCA certified coaches will receive a discount.
Lydiard Certificate I&II $350
Add to cart

OMG, what has happened to January?

I mean we are a few days away from the beginning of February. Where has all the days gone?

This means I best get busy.

Besides going to work and family life, which is all great, here is a quick review of January’s highlights.

* Finish the First Call Marathon with son Ammon on January 1. Finish time: 3:54. Not to shabby and a great way to start the new year. Downside to this event was running by the Red Hook Brewery four times – without stopping.

* Started a three month commitment as Lego Coach to a group of 6 year-olds, including grandson Finn. Being a Lego Coach is very similar to herding cats who are playing with Legos. First order of Coach duties is to separate the difficult Lego pieces. Trust me, 6 year-olds are not very patience. Good thing is most know how to tie their shoes.

* Granddaughter Harper turned 4! As a gift Shelly and I took her to the American Girl Doll Store in Lynnwood. It was a horrific interesting experience. I have never seen so much pink and so many freaky looking dolls in one place in all of my life. Did I say it was horrific interesting?

American Girl Doll Store

Nightmare on Doll Street

* Seattle Seahawks are going to the Super Bowl. Just want to point out that Shelly and I move to Seattle and the Hawks go to the Super Bowl. Coincidence? I think not. The whole Seattle Gilbert Clan have been enjoying all the games leading up to Super Bowl Sunday. Go Hawks!

For Super Bowl Sunday we will be enjoying my home made chili, which is becoming a football tradition. Well, we have had it once, with enjoyment.

 

Running is going pretty good. Wish I running more miles than I am, but . . . there is February.

See you on the roads.

 


It is written that to make a goal more meaningful and concrete one should share it with others. This makes sense to me. Sharing one’s goals with their community makes the goal more real.

So, here it goes. (This is when I take a deep breath).

My goal for 2014 is to break the US 60-64 age group U.S. Marathon Record, which is 2:42:44. This record was set by Clive Davies – age 64 – while running in the 1979 Portland Marathon. Clive died at the age of 85.

My plan is to make this attempt on September 7 at the Skagit Flats Marathon, directed by Terry Sentinella.

Can I do this? That’s the question I am dedicating the next nine months of training to find out.

Clark


I ran 331 miles in 12 days.

Not all at one time.

In May I ran 167 miles in 7 days from Vernal, Utah to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. In August I ran 164 miles in 6 days from Mahoney City, Pennsylvania to New York City, New York. All for MS Run the US Relay.

I learned a lot about myself and about running.

Want to learn what I learned?

Keep reading.

  1. Getting started. Sometimes when you first wake-up and realize you need to run long, the mind starts telling you all the reasons why you can’t. Leave it to the mind and you’ll stay in bed. I found that getting my feet moving was the key to waking the mind up to what my body could actually do. When the brain gets on board anything can happen.
  2. Real Food is good. That just seems silly to say, but it’s totally true. I have tired most name brand sports drink, gels and the what-have-yous. Running magazines are full of ads that tells us what products works best. My truth is that sports-aid-items do not work for me. I have found that real food in the form of fruits, oatmeal, raisins, nuts, whole grains, and potato chips (I realize that potato chips might not be considered a real food, but it doesn’t come out of a tube) really works for me. I also like water over sport drinks. And Coke. Nothing like a cold satisfying Coke at 10 miles. Just the right amount of sugar, caffeine and pleasure; which can keep me going for another 10 miles. Add some potato chips and I will run 30 miles. Don’t even get me started on doughnuts.
  3. After 28.5 miles. Nothing tastes better.Beer – it’s an acceptable post-run beverage. I am a man of rewards and beer is one of those rewards that can keep me moving forward. Knowing that a cold frosty bottle of brew; which has my name on it, makes those last few miles bearable. Oh, there are some nutritional benefits, but who cares. Right?
  4. Shirtless running. When the sun is out, the temperature warm and the humidity is high I prefer running without a shirt. Please do not give me all that crap about sunburn, sunscreen and skin cancer. We were born to run and we were born to be out in the sun. Period. Give it a try, you’ll find it refreshing. Anton knows. (Disclaimer – local decently laws may apply.)
  5. Wear the right shoes. The right shoes for you, that is. A good running store, like West Seattle Runner, will have you try various models to help you decide what feels good. Pick the shoes that are going to support you on your adventure. I would have been nuts to pick a lightweight, minimal shoe to run 30 miles on pavement. With broken glass and dead snakes.
  6. Brooks GlycerinHigh tech material can make you day. These new tech shirts and shorts will wick (a word a runner never said in 70’s and 80’s) moisture away from your skin. This allows you to stay cool and dry. Easy to pack, carry and dries quickly. Make sure they fit and will not rub you in all the wrong places. If they do rub, get some Body Glide.
  7. Have a great support person or team to help you. These will be people who care about you and will have your food and gear ready for when you’ll need it. They can also do your thinking for you when you aren’t thinking right. Just remember to be nice to them, especially when your Demon Side appears.
  8. Know your equipment. The morning of your adventure is not the time to try to figure out your new GPS watch. Or even a headlamp. You need to know how everything works before you even put them in your pack. Read the manual and experiment.
  9. Know where you are going. External input is nice, but comes with a percentage of error. GPS watches can be off. A nice person may not know what they hell they are talking about. Memory fails. It is your responsibility to know where you are going. Know your route and make notes if needed.
  10. Have Fun! This adventure is yours. You trained and dreamed to do this. Now, go out and have some fun. And be safe.

 

 

Shirtless Running


I know I promised my article – “10 Things I Learned While Running Many Miles Over A Few Days – posted by now. You are just going to have to wait a tad longer. Moving, which we have been doing for the past month, is serious work and takes a lot out of us movers. You could ask any professional mover and they would agree. They would probably hand you their business card as well. I wish that I had been given a mover’s business card. Things could have been much different. Oh, the joys of hindsight. I would rather go run to Texas than have to move again. I am still suffering some sort of trauma from it all. Heavy sigh.

That all said, I am working on the piece and am up to number 4. Please be patient. All good things comes to those who wait. That is what my mom said. I have a sister who likes to say it as well. I must have been a very impatient child if both my mom, and now my sister, are reminding me to be patient

Life in West Seattle is good. There are squirrels living right next door in the vacant house’s attic. They seem like a nice squirrel family. As nice as they come, I think. We didn’t have any squirrels back on the island. Finn and Harper tell me that the house is haunted. Maybe it is. They should know; they’re kids.

I have named one of the squirrels Peppy. I don’t know if it is the male or the female. The art of determining the sex of squirrels is unknown to me. Peppy sits in the apple tree in front of our house. I watch him/her from the large window in my home office. He eats while studying me. Peppy has very small eyes and a very bushy tale. I have seen him hang upside down while eating an apple, which must not be good for his digestion. I have tried to take Peppy’s picture, but he is camera shy. Soon I will outwit him and take his picture. Then I will post it so you can see.

Our cats are freaked out by Peppy and his family. Since they have never seen a squirrel before I think that they think they are odd looking cats. Maybe they are just that. I will need to ask Finn and Harper. They will know and won’t be surprised that I don’t know.

Running has been good for me. I wake up at 4:30 AM and prepare myself for a 5 AM meet-up with son Ammon. We run the streets of West Seattle. He points out things of interest that I won’t remember. I find that there are not all that many cars on the streets at 5; although, I have seen other runners out. I think they are sleepy too. It’s a good time to run, but anytime is a good time to run. Right?

I promise I will have my “10 Things I Learned” piece posted up before the rise of the next full moon. Until then, run happy and run hard.

Clark


This week my focus will be on moving into our new place in West Seattle; although I am running. At 5 fracking o’clock in the morning with Son Ammon.

Ammon is showing me West Seattle and pointing out some very cool places to check out. The problem is I quickly forget them, which I am blaming on the early morning hour.

I have been thinking about the similarities of moving and running. I realized that they share a very important principle – when you drop your baggage and excess weight your moving and running will be much better.

Ok, I know it’s a stretch.


This week I have been in Seattle finishing up on an house rental agreement. Oh, if you didn’t know, Shelly and I are moving to West Seattle to be closer to family and enjoy the comforts of the big city – like cheap inexpensive beer.

On Monday, Shelly started a new position with the Seattle School District and me, well, I have been scoping out the local landscape, which has required me to drink a few beers. Bartenders are a great community resources. They know the haps.

On Wednesday, Son Ammon took me on a running tour of West Seattle at 5:00 am. We had a good run inspite of my sore foot from running 162 miles last week. Learn some things concerning the layout of West Seattle, which is a good thing.

Next on the list is to move our stuff down from Friday Harbor and into the new house. Might happen this weekend.

Hummm, there’s something else I am suppose to do besides running, drinking and playing with grandchildren (not in that order though) – oh, look find a job. Best move that up on the list some. (Resumes are available for viewing if interested. Contact me.)

Next week I will be posting – “What I learned from running a butt load of miles in a few days.” This article will have all those cool things I learned while on the road, like all snakes laying still on the road are not actually dead.

You won’t want to miss out on that one.

image


Dear Reader:

I have been thinking, lately, about the the direction of http://www.runhappyrunhard.com. Historically this site has been an informational site for running activities in and around San Juan Island mixed with some technical information. I have also thrown in stuff about my own running.

Working on this website has been fun. Maybe even fulfilling. A little fulfilling. Not a whole bunch. My current issue is that the site seems to be stuffy, stale and dry. Like the stuff one reads to help them fall asleep. This is not how I want to write. Besides, I am a funny guy and I want to throw humor into my work. The type of humor that makes one giggle or even blow beer out of noses.

So here is what I am going to do. I’m changing the direction of the present site to a more funny and insightful one. I want writing for this site to be fun for me and produce some inspiration to the reader to go out and run.

For the more technical aspects about running I am going to use http://www.seattlepirun.com. Here you will find shoe reviews, race updates and interviews. Stuff like that.

Run Happy Run Hard will be more about my running and how I use running to help me get through this journey called life. It will make for some interesting reading. Really.

Clark


On May 30th, Clark Gilbert started on a running journey that would change his life. Leaving Vernal, Utah at 6:00 am, Clark ran 167 miles, along highway 45, to Steamboat Springs, Colorado – all in 7 days. His journey was a part of the MS Run the US Relay which began on April 12 in Los Angeles, California and will finish on September 6 in New York City, New York. The Relay’s purpose is to raise awareness and money to better understand multiple sclerosis and to find a cure. The Relay includes 16 runners who ran a marathon each day of their segment.

Just finished running my 167 miles.

Just finished running my 167 miles.

Clark is at it again. On August 31 he will leave Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania and run to Fort Lee, New Jersey. Stopping at the shore of the Hudson River, overlooking New York City, on September 4. His total mileage, after 5 days of running, will be close to 150 miles. This will be the last long segment of the Relay before the grand finale, where Ashley Kumlien (MS Run the US Relay organizer) runs while pushing her MS stricken mother, and joined by other relay runners, up and over the Hudson River into downtown New York City.

Clark is doing this to support conquering a disease that affects many people in San Juan County, as well as throughout the Pacific Northwest. “I am running to serve others” said Clark. “There are too many who can’t walk through their homes without some type of aid. These are who I think about when I feel like I can’t run another step.”

Visit www.runhappyrunhard.com for up-to-date information on Clark’s second run as well as his writings from his first adventure.

To donate to help develop an understanding and find a cure for MS, please visit http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/msruntheus/clarkgilbert.

 


I know. You read the title and chuckled. Everyone does. It’s the Swedish word fartlek. Not fart lick, even though they sound the same. Fartlek means “speed play.” In the running world, any time you mix hard/fast running with a rest period it is considered a fartlek. What makes it different from speed training is that a fartlek is not as structured. I mean, doing speed training on the track might be something like 4 sets of 1 mile with 400m recovery.

A fartlek would be more like running a 7 mile loop, then running for 1 minute at a pace faster than race pace. Next, run for a 1 minute recovery. Or, you could run really hard from one power/telephone pole to the next, then recover. You do that for 5 miles, then run a cool down mile and call the day “good.”

I have found fartleks good in developing both speed and endurance while being a somewhat pleasant experience. Meaning one isn’t just running circles around a track for miles. Fartleks can be a fun way groups can speed train together. For example you have 10 runners running in line and at every minute the runner in the back sprints up to the front and takes the lead. This type of fartlek would be repeated for miles and miles.Not only a great way to build speed and endurance, but a great way to make and develop friendships. My running friends all love me for the crazy ways I come up to train.


This week we are going to look at jogging; what it is and what it is not. The story goes that famed running coach from New Zealand, Arthur Lydiard, made popular the term “jogging”. What Lydiard was doing was promoting a slower than normal running pace that also allowed for socializing. Instead of running mile repeats or intervals, Lydiard encouraged runners to head out onto the roads and run slower. Take it easy. Enjoy the sights. Discuss things. Solve the world problems or debate why liquid soap was invented. Jogging provided these types of experiences; cause discussing the latest Bruce Willis movie during mile repeats is not going to happen.Trust me on that.

US running coach Bill Bowerman brought Lydiard’s thinking to the US in 1966 by publishing the book “Jogging”. I own a copy of said book.

I hate to say it but some faster runners didn’t like the hordes of new and slower runners who were coming on the scene back in the 1970′s. Jamming up the lanes on the track forcing faster runners to the outside. Getting attention cause how they looked, which was more relaxed with nice hairdos. These slower newbies were calling themselves “runners”. Many faster runners, when running slower, were talking smack about all the new joggers on the scene. Newbies were more interested in weight loss/control and health benefits that running can produce than how fast they ran that last mile in. They couldn’t really care less if they were on the path for Olympic gold or not. They met as groups and ran around parks, neighborhoods and city streets. They began to popularize running as a social outlet. Joggers also showed that running could be really fun. Oh my.

Unfortunately the “running” group look down at the “jogging” group as a lesser group. Some runners would cringe if they were ever called a jogger and would quickly correct the term. I have had people introduce themselves to me and then say something like “I’m just a jogger. Not a runner like you.” As though their activity needed validation.

Does it really matter if a person is a runner or a jogger? Do we really need to have a “better than thou” stand for an act that comes to us from our genetic code? I don’t think so.I think we are all runners and joggers. They are one in the same.


I have had this idea for awhile to have a running term of the week. My friend and running buddy, Stan The Wine Man, has a wine term of the day, that he posts on www.blucid.com. By reading his definitions you can really develop an understanding of wine. One thing I do know is that Stan The Wine Man knows his wine.

I know running. Been running for, well, let’s say a while. I have ran on both road and trails, plus many loops around the track. I have also ran every race distance up to 50 miles. I coached others as well. My life’s passion is running. Pure and simple.

In honor of my love and knowledge I bring to you “Running Term of the Week”. Ta-da!

This week our term will be “Running”.

My definition of running is pretty simple – its the motion produced by the rapid movement of the feet. Not to be confused with the Fox Trot or the East Coast Swing, where rapid feet movement is a requirement. In order to really run one does need feet. Most mammals and lizards qualify. Slugs do not. Birds and frogs may hop. Snakes, well they slither.

Rapid movement of one’s feet is purely speculative and personal. Some people, like my old, dear friend Steve. Steve considered himself a runner even though he was slow, by his own omission, as sin. He, in my mind, was more of a plodder. After running with Steve a few times I realized that speed had no bearing on the question if someone is really a runner or not. Like I said it’s personal. Steve considered himself a runner. I was always honored to run with him. Slow speeds and all. Steve is now dead. Lost the battle with prostate cancer.Long may you run, Steve. Long may you run.

It’s like the old saying “as you think you shall become” or as the Bible says, “ For as he thinketh in his heart, so is he.” If you (man or woman) think you are a runner and are spending time every day running, then you are a runner. No mater how fast or how slow. One foot in front of the of the other in rapid motion is running. Pure and simple.

Large creatures lurk in strange places. One needs to be prepared.

People tell me that they could never be a runner. I tell them if they had something very big chasing them they would become a runner pretty quick. They agree. Granted, they would still be lunch or dinner depending on the time of day they were being chased. They would at least be giving running the good ole college try. For a block or two.

Next week we will explore the difference between running and jogging.


Brooks Partners with MapMyFitness to Inspire, Educate and Connect Runners

 

Seattle – July 16, 2013 –   For many, running is about more than just numbers or routes. It’s also about community and connection. Today, Brooks Running Company gives those runners a virtual gathering place: The Run Happy Group, where runners nationwide can find inspiration, education and connection. The digital community lives on MapMyFitness properties, including MapMyRun and MapMyFitness.

 The Run Happy Group comes out of a one-of-a-kind partnership between leading running brand Brooks Running Company and innovative social fitness company MapMyFitness and their MapMyRun app. The Run Happy Group is the first fully integrated program between a major consumer sportswear company and MapMyFitness.

Exclusive to the partnership is a “Rate My Run” Brooks-sponsored feature that allows everyone who logs a run through MapMyFitness properties to share (and rate) their experience with options like Crushed Goals, Kicked Butt and Finished with a Smile. The rating system encourages runners to express their fitness progress through multiple social channels, building up the community that the Run Happy group promotes.

 “Runners tell us that, after health and fitness, the No. 1 reason they run – and the most common reason they continue to run – is for fun and enjoyment,” said Heather Snavely, Senior Director, Global Brand. “We created the Run Happy Group to give runners a place to share those fun experiences and to be a source of inspiration for each other. As the leading online community of runners, MapMyFitness was the perfect partner to bring this community to life.”

 MapMyRun’s current features allow users to easily track, analyze and share running routes, distance, time, pace, calories burned and much more. Brooks’ Run Happy Group adds exclusive new features designed just for runners to the desktop experience. These features include expertise on running and racing, inspirational and motivational content from Brooks and partners, a Run Happy Instagram feed and the ability to “Rate My Run.”

 Local groups are another integral part of the Run Happy Group. After joining the nationwide group, runners can sync up with a local group managed by an in-town specialty running store where they’ll discover new routes in their neighborhood, details on local events and runs, store discounts and more. Launching with more than 300 retailers across the country, local groups allow members to run with more than just their phones, they allow them to find and run with friends.

 MapMyRun is available for iOS, Android and Blackberry users. Runners can join the Run Happy Group by following the “Rate My Run” prompts after completing a run on the app or by visitingwww.mapmyrun.com/runhappy.  

 

 


Just finished running my 167 miles.

Just finished running my 166 miles.

It has been close to a month since I finished my 166 mile segment for MS Run the US Relay. I have spent the past few weeks thinking and reflecting on my experience. I wanted to be really clear with myself before I wrote this summary. To say the least this experience was nothing but awesome.

My last day running for the Relay was a somber day. Rain fell the night before. The west wind was blowing in a storm towards the mountains I was running to. Unlike the six prior days, this day would not be chilly in the morning and hot as the sun rose, but just plain cold. I was to run 26.2, a full marathon. I was totally ready to go. After six days of averaging over 25 miles, another 26.2 miles would be nothing. By the time I finished the distance, due to logistics of finish line preparations, I ended up running 24.2 miles. I was a tad disappointed with the shortness, but seeing my sister Merit at the finish line made-up for any disappointment. Merit drove over from Cheyenne, Wyoming and brought Bill Sinack, the runner who would replace me, with her from Denver. Bill would go on to run 200 miles in 9 days. Bill did a great job. Also at the finish line was Ashley, Relay director and Lucas, our local running host. Thank you all.

As I mentioned my day was somber. I really didn’t want to stop. I would have kept running all the way to New York if I could. The cold storm clouds blowing in added to the sadness I was feeling. Good bye sunshine. Leaving the Relay was a total bummer for me. I was having so much fun – much like a summer camp for crazy adult runners. I missed Shelly. I missed Ammon and his family. I missed my friends. I missed so many aspects of my life, but found such a quiet that my soul really started craving more quiet. My sister, Carla, asked me what I like most about running for 7 days. I needed to think for a moment and then I replied “the quiet of the open road”. Just being on the road, running. Putting one foot in front of the other. That’s all I had to do. My mind thought about so many things and then the quiet seeped in. I began to think of nothing. This was such a cool experience, an experience that I have found to be most hard in explaining. I think this is what meditation is design to do, quiet the mind. I experienced an intense feeling of mental peace. This was what running this long road gave me – a sense of peace.

As I reflect back on my week of running for the Relay I have a huge sense of gratitude. No just for running. For Shelly who re-designed how we ate so I would have the daily energy to run as many training miles as I did, which allowed me to kick some butt. From the very beginning of this project, Shelly’s support was strong and much needed. Thank you Shelly. I have also have much gratitude for Ashley Kumlein, Relay Director and Aaron for their “handling” of me on the road. Their good cheer and dedication to my success help make this experience most special. Thank you Ashley and Mr. Aaron. You made me feel like a Rock Star.

There are sixteen of us running in this Relay from Los Angeles to New York City. These are amazing people who have gone to the road to log  their miles for the cause of understanding and finding a cure for MS. I respect all of them. I am grateful for their dedication, not just to running the Relay, but finding a cure. All of their kind words and helpful tips were appreciated.

Finally, I appreciate all of those friends and family who gave to this cause of finding a cure for MS. I appreciate the trust that they had in me to go and run. Thank you for your support.

So many people have been asking me “what’s next.” Don’t really know. I do know that I am getting out the door and logging my miles; partly to keep my fitness up and partly to find that peace.

Stay tuned.


4th of July 5K 2013

 

Many thanks for all those who helped and ran our event this year!


All right, here we go for another year of the Firecracker 5,000! This popular 3.1 mile (5000 meters or 5K) leaves in front of Best Western and heads out Lampard Road, turns around and heads back to town.

Registration: 7:00 to 7:45 am

Race Starts: 8:00 am

Event is Timed.

Awards not normally given, unless we just have something we want to give away. Like an old truck.

Results will be posted within two days.

Cost: $10.00 adults and $5.00 youth.


Internet connectivity has not been very good the last few days which has prevented me from providing updates.

Here is a summary of my mileage:

Day 1 – 27.4
Day 2 – 26.8
Day 3 – 20.8
Day 4 – 30.7
Day 5 – 20.5
Total: 126.2

Over the next two days I will be running the last 41 miles into Steamboat Springs. This journey is about over. A part of me is sad for that. My plan is to run 14 or so miles then end with a full marathon in Steamboat on Thursday.

The journey has been good. I am have been amazed by how well my body is holding up. Feet are just fine, legs working like pistons, arms swinging like they should. Brain? Well, that is questionable. Each morning when I head out the door, so to speak, to run my body has been ready to go. I am very grateful for that.

For the past 5 days I have been looking at a vast amount of land with nothing but sagebrush growing on it. Now, I am from Wyoming and grew up with sagebrush, but I have seen a ton more. Yesterday I saw some cows. Today llamas.

The weather has been clear and bright. Hot as well. Today, in Craig, Colorado, the temps were cooler and a very small amount of rain this afternoon. The sunshine had given me an opportunity to work on my tan, which is something I haven’t done since 1995 when I moved to the island.

Yesterday I decided to not wear my watch/GPS device. I thought that I really didn’t need it as this is not a timed event. I have gotten back to just running for the sake of running. That was a pretty cool thing to realize.

Ashley, from MS Run the US, is really good about tracking mileage and where to meet me for water, etc.. She is a tremendous help and a very nice person. She makes sure I have what I need to eat and drink. She also drives the RV.

This whole event has been nothing short of amazing. I can’t seem to find the words to explain what I mean, but I am working on that.

Until then, be safe and go for a run.

Clark


image

Sunrise just minutes before my start.

Daily Mileage: 27.4
Running Time: 4:53

It has begun. My segment of the MS Run the US Relay that is. How very cool and exciting.

At a tad past 6:00 am, while the sun was coming up I started my 7 day journey to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The starting point was a few miles west of Vernal taking me over 7 miles to get through town.

image

Welcome to Vernal

Vernal is a nice town with a very long main street. One of the things I realized was between 6 and 7 am all the fast food and cafes do one thing and that is cook bacon. I ran with the wonderful aroma of cooking bacon, which is a really nice way to start a day. Bacon and running, that is.

image

30 miles to go and I have run almost 8

Our original plan was for me to run to Dinosaur, CO, which we were told, by Cherly, was 30 miles away. When I had reached the mileage information sign I had already run close to 8 miles. Total distance would have been 38 miles, which was do-able for me. In a pinch. I was feeling pretty good and thought I would go ahead continue to Dinosaur. Tomorrow I would run a shorter distance. That was my plan. Maybe not the best plan, but a plan.

Everything was looking pretty good until mile 16, that’s when I started climbing. Not the type of climbing we do in the San Juan Islands – short and steep – no this climb was long and gradual. Close to 4 miles long. Maybe 5. Seemed like 10. My pace slowed down some, but fast enough to stay ahead of the snakes.

While running through Vernal and all the way to Jensen I encountered heavy traffic of both personal automobiles and semis. After Jensen the traffic thinned out in a very big way. Thank you Jensen. I found that the truckers were really good about giving me room as they passed, but if they didn’t it was due to another truck or car coming from behind me. Thank you truckers. You are the best.

Ashley, the founder and operator of MS Run the US is great. She would meet me with water or whatever I needed, including a nice smoothie at mile 18. Thank you Ashley.

Once, when a semi was coming towards me and without the normal given room I moved over to the side of the narrow shoulder. Next to where the vegetation grows and was buzzed by a rattlesnake. That caused me to dance a jig and taught me to keep clear of the bushes. I wonder what the trucker thought when he saw me dancing down the road for a spell. I don’t like snakes.

Ashley met up with me a couple times to run with me. She was with me when I went through the marathon mark (4:36), which was pretty cool. We talked about going the remainder of 12 miles into Dinosaur; determining that it would be best to call it a day at the RV. Total Mileage 27.4 with running time of 4:53.

The clear skies, sunshine and sweeping views made this a great run. I can’t wait to get on the road tomorrow and see what it has to bring.



Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 31 other followers

%d bloggers like this: